‘Survivor’ Castaway Brice: ‘They Can No Longer Call it the Beauty Tribe’

by | March 6, 2014 at 11:46 AM | RealityTV, Survivor, TV News

Brice Johnston (CBS)

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Nobody ever said “Survivor” was a fair game. Sometimes a well-liked player who helps around camp and pulls his weight in challenges is voted out before a shelter-destroying, fire-dousing, rice-burning liability.

I spoke with Brice Johnston the morning after he found himself on the wrong side of the numbers and asked him about immunity idol clues, why he didn’t side with LJ and Jeremiah, and the mental state of the Brains tribe…

Gordon Holmes: So, is it right to still call this tribe the “Beauty Tribe” now that you’ve been eliminated?
Brice Johnston: Absolutely not. That name has been stricken and they have to find another name. Now that Brice is gone they can no longer call it the Beauty Tribe.
Holmes: Any thoughts on what they should go with?
Johnston: Country bumpkins, maybe? (Laughs)

Holmes: We didn’t see a lot of how the tribe ended up with you and Morgan on one side and LJ, Jeremiah, Alexis, and Jefra on the other. Could you break it down for us?
Johnston: It’s not hard to explain. I felt like LJ and Jeremiah felt comfortable because they were two heterosexual men and they were uncomfortable with me. Honestly, that’s just what I felt. And they went with the two weak girls who were not playing the game. I came on “Survivor,” day one I was playing the game. So, LJ and Jeremiah were not only threatened that I could play a social game, but I was physical and I could survive. They were immediately threatened by that. They ostracized Morgan, so I went to Morgan because maybe we could use her bosoms to get someone else. But it didn’t work, because I don’t think those guys are interested in bosoms…if you know what I mean.
Holmes: Oh, I do. Was there anything specific that they did that made you feel like your sexual orientation was an issue for them?
Johnston: Being out there on the island you could definitely feel it. Or, maybe they wanted to stay away from it for other reasons. (Laughs)

Holmes: It seemed like Jeremiah was considering flipping to you and Morgan. Was that ever a realistic scenario?
Johnston: Absolutely, I just think that Jeremiah is not smart enough to think on his own. I felt like LJ beat it into his head. I don’t think Jeremiah can process that LJ is a huge threat. So, why keep him? But Jeremiah is used to cutting lawns and taking pictures, so he couldn’t process what was going on. I don’t fault Jeremiah for that. He doesn’t understand the game too well.

Holmes: LJ was selected as the leader on day one. Did he maintain that role once you got to the beach?
Johnston: He definitely did. He wanted to make himself dominant for those girls who were very weak so he could seem like a leader. I think what surprised him is, I was a leader as well. I was doing a lot of things around camp, I held my own in the challenges. I was funny to be around at camp. So, I think LJ was so threatened by  me.

Holmes: What was your relationship with Alexis like?
Johnston: On the island, we got along well. Everyone, for the most part, got along. However, when it comes to strategic moves, I know who’s talking to me and who is not. I know who’s a pawn, and who’s just a number. And I felt like Alexis was just numbers to them.

Holmes: The Brains Tribe had a titanic meltdown last week. Did you have any idea how bad it was over there with J’Tia dumping the rice?
Johnston: We did not know how bad it was. But, when we would come to the challenges we could see in their eyes that it wasn’t going well. We didn’t know how bad until last week. They looked drained.

Holmes: Did Morgan tell you about the immunity idol clue?
Johnston: I don’t think we needed to have that conversation. When we walked up on the beach it was pretty obvious what was going on. We just knew, “Why are you coming out of the water looking like a ‘Baywatch’ hottie?” We never had that conversation because I didn’t want to pressure her.

Holmes: Alright, word association time. Now, I know this is going to be hard for you because you don’t remember their names, but let’s start with Morgan.
Johnston: Hottie Ba-tottie.
Holmes: LJ?
Johnston: Horse whisperer.
Holmes: Alexis?
Johnston: Bootie shaker.
Holmes: Jeremiah?
Johnston: Dummy.
Holmes: Jefra?
Johnston: Who’s that?

Holmes: What’s your takeaway from this experience?
Johnston: Growing up in Philadelphia being a gay, black man, I definitely was not always so secure with myself. But like I said at Tribal Council, the last couple of years of my life I’ve just been so proud. Just taking my life by the horns. So “Survivor” confirmed that for me. Everything I knew about myself; that I’m amazing, I’m smart, I’m talented, I’m good-looking, I’m funny…coming on “Survivor” confirmed it. And moving forward I’ve got a lot of good things coming up. Being on that island, I smelled so funky, I never want to smell that funky again. I went back to Philly and I started my own fragrance company.  Fragrances by Brice Izyah will be available this May.

Any Questions? Drop me a line on Twitter: @gordonholmes