Matthews Criticized for Saying He’s ‘Glad’ Hurricane ‘Helped’ Obama

by | November 8, 2012 at 10:58 AM | TV News

MSNBC's Chris Matthews (Photo: Getty Images)

MSNBC’s Chris Matthews is under fire for appearing to be a little too gleeful about the role Hurricane Sandy may have played in President Obama’s re-election.

In offering up an explanation for Obama’s victory Tuesday night during MSNBC’s Election Night coverage, Matthews credited the president’s comportment in the big storm for helping to put him over the top on Election Day. On that subject, Matthews reportedly blurted out, “I’m so glad we had that storm last week because I think the storm was one of those things” that helped propel the president to victory.

While it’s easy to understand what Matthews meant by that, it’s also not difficult to comprehend why many viewers felt he was being grossly insensitive in expressing happiness about the timely arrival of a storm responsible for more than 100 deaths, the destruction of untold thousands of homes, and billions of dollars worth of damage to property for hundreds of miles of Atlantic coastline.

According to a New York Post story — here — some viewers who heard what Matthews said turned to Twitter to express their anger.

Here’s an NBC News story about the storm’s possible effect on the election:

“Chris Matthews should be fired . . . Over 100 died in the US/millions hurting,” Tweeted one viewer.

“Chris Matthews is thrilled about Hurricane Sandy, if it helped Obama get elected,” Tweeted another.

Matthews has made no secret of his admiration for President Obama. The MSNBC personality addressed the subject of his hurricane comment Wednesday on his MSNBC show, “Hardball.” He blamed the comment on weariness that set in after being on TV for many hours Tuesday night. “I was on for 10 hours straight,” he said, according to The Post. “And I said something terrible. I could say it was because I was tired, but I wasn’t thinking of the horrible mess the storm has made. … I was too focused on who would win and who would lose, and I left out the number one job of a broadcaster — to think of the real lives of people, whose dreams have been hurt and, in some cases, destroyed.”

Cue the Zamboni! We liked NBC’s “low-tech,” ice-rink map of the U.S. on Election Night: