‘Anger Management’ Renewal Likely, Sheen ‘Not Insane Anymore’

by | July 28, 2012 at 1:27 PM | Anger Management, Fall TV Preview 2012

'Anger Management's Charlie Sheen onstage during the FX portion of the 2012 Summer TCA Press Tour in Beverly Hills (Photo: Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Charlie Sheen appeared bright and early Saturday morning before TV critics in Beverly Hills for FX’s TCA presentation for the new sitcom “Anger Management.”

Wearing plaid shorts and shoes with no socks, Sheen rolled out on stage to talk therapy, family and trainwrecks.

“My life is different now that I’m not insane anymore,” Sheen told journalists Saturday. After a long pause, he said to the series creator, “Right, Bruce?”

In shades of his real life, Sheen plays a therapist with issues named Charlie on the FX sitcom, which opened to record-breaking numbers but has had a steady decline in viewership since its debut.

FX president John Landgraf confirmed earlier in the morning that the network has not yet made an official decision on the future of “Anger Management,” but he hinted that a renewal is likely. (The “Management” deal stipulates that the initial 10 episodes must perform well before FX agrees to renew the series for an additional 90 episodes.)

Additional proof that it’s favorable: FX announced Saturday that if the sitcom moves forward, Charlie’s father Martin Sheen will join the show in the recurring role of Charlie’s on-screen dad (Martin makes his first appearance in this week’s episode).

So with four episodes left to air before the decision is made, does Sheen feel pressure?

“It doesn’t put pressure on me, that puts pressure on Selma,” Sheen joked, referring to costar Selma Blair.

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Predictably, the conversation quickly turned to the chaos of the actor’s personal life.

“You guys can leave now,” Charlie joked to his cast mates when the questions from journalists were All About Sheen, leaving the seven other people on the panel twiddling their thumbs.

“I’ve talked about it so much already, I don’t want to bore everybody here,” he began.

“It was a crazy time, like a dream I couldn’t wake up from, a train I couldn’t get off of,” Sheen explained.

“It’ll never happen again, that’s the cool thing,” he added.

Another lesson learned? “Don’t go on the road with no act.”

Whether he’s on or off the wagon, Sheen declares that “Anything I’m doing is fun. I don’t look at it as chaos, I look at it as challenges.”

As for the challenge of churning out an additional 90 episodes of “Anger Management” (meaning more work and potentially less play), the prospect doesn’t worry Sheen.

He’s “excited as hell” about it … “I don’t think 90 is going to be enough.”

Actually, “It’s daunting to hear “the back 90,” interjected creator and executive producer Bruce Helford, who added the series’ production schedule is pretty brutal. “The hours are horrifying, truly.”

“There’s no real rehearsal for the show,” he added, claiming that it’s not to accommodate his unpredictable star but for “financial reasons,” although he hopes it makes for a “more spontaneous experience.”

Of his working relationship with Sheen, Helford explained, “With ‘Two and a Half Men,’ it was lucrative show, but Charlie didn’t really have a voice on that show or have creative input, it wasn’t built that way. We are truly partners here.”

When asked why he brought his dad Martin onto his new show, Sheen noted that it’s just become a pattern, “He did Spin City and Two and a Half Men, so I figured he should be on this too.”

Sheen admitted that surrounding himself with family on set helps keep him in line; in addition to his father, Sheen’s ex-wife Denise Richards also recently guest starred on the show. “We had a ball,” Sheen says of working with the mother of his two daughters. “She was fun to work with, and she’s welcome back,” although there are no plans for it.

The elder Sheen’s guest episode of “Anger Management” airs this Thursday, where viewers can look forward to him doing a Marlon Brando impersonation from their infamous 1979 film, “Apocalypse Now.”

Charlie described how he spent a lot time with his dad on the meltdown-heavy set of “Apocalypse Now,” but Charlie says Martin was a “great” dad, “he was a regular dad — except he took us on the road to make movies.”

The self-destructive star also revealed that he once considered writing a memoir and calling it “Apocalypse Me.” “Then I said can that … it’s a waste of time.”

“Anger Management” airs Thursdays at 9:30 ET on FX.