Watch: Morning Shows Honor Dick Clark

by | April 19, 2012 at 9:58 PM | Celebrities, Recap, TV News

Ryan Seacrest and Dick Clark scored big ratings on New Year's Eve (Photo: ABC)


The ladies of daytime television spent their mornings grieving the loss of TV pioneer Dick Clark and honored him as a transformational figure who changed both television and music as we know it.

Clark died on Wednesday morning after suffering a massive heart attack. He was 83 years old.

On “Today,” Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb drank to his memory, recalling what it was like to work with him.

“He’s one of those guys we all remember something about,” said Hoda.

“He had a huge production company and I worked for him several times,” said Gifford. “When you worked for Dick you knew you were going to have a good time, but you knew you weren’t going to get paid a lot. It was well known in the industry but everybody wanted to work with him. He was loyal and he was a visionary.”

Over on “The View,” Whoopi Goldberg and Barbara Walters led a discussion on Clark’s impact on pop culture and how it still resonates today.

“Younger people may not realize how much he actually changed pop culture forever with ‘American Bandstand’.”

Goldberg recalled watching “American Bandstand” growing up, “I remember that was the thing you watched because you’d get up and, you had cartoons on Saturday morning, and you knew you were no longer a cartoon person when you started watching ‘American Bandstand, for me, I saw every conceivable performer, black and white.”

“He worked almost until the end,” said Walters. “He loved to work, even after his stroke when people thought maybe he should stay home. We can call this one a legend, and that one a legend, he is.”

On “The Talk,” Sharon Osbourne, who knows her way around the music industry, showed a picture of her family posing with Clark, and explained the significance of their meeting.

“We were running through script for the American Music Awards which he produced every year, and it was such a joy for me that my children got the chance to do a little bit of work with him because he was such an icon. He was a pioneer in this industry and he paved the way for so many people”