It’s a Guest-Star Casting Coup: Will Ferrell on ‘The Office’

by | January 26, 2011 at 8:00 PM | The Office, TV News

Will Ferrell (Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

Will Ferrell (Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images)


This just might be the best casting news of the season: Will Ferrell is guest-starring on “The Office.

And not only that, he’ll be on multiple episodes playing “a branch manager who arrives from the home office [of Dunder-Mifflin Paper] and proves to be just as inappropriate as Michael [series star Steve Carell],” NBC said in an announcement late Wednesday.

Can you believe this? Two obnoxious branch managers, both played by Ferrell and Carell – it’s like a dream come true. Ferrell will be seen in a story arc lasting four episodes, an NBC spokeswoman told Fancast. The episodes will air “toward the end of the season,” she said, indicating that the episodes will likely air in or around the May sweeps, which will also represent Carell’s exit from the show.

Could Ferrell, in fact, be the replacement branch manager we’ve all been wondering about? That seems unlikely, if only because the former “SNL” funnyman is such a huge movie star. But it does seem as if he’ll be helping the show — and fans — say farewell to Michael Scott.

The big question: Will Ferrell’s character show up one day on “The Office” wearing just his briefs, which has become kind of a signature for Ferrell? The NBC announcement didn’t say, but we’re keeping our fingers crossed.

“We found Steve Carell when he was nothing but a movie star and we turned him into a television star,” executive producer Paul Lieberstein said in a hilarious prepared statement. “We are proud to continue ‘The Office’s’ tradition of discovering famous talent, and we hope that once America gets a good look at Will, they’ll see what we see: tremendous raw sexuality.” Lieberstein, of course, plays hapless HR man Toby Flenderson on the show, in addition to his role as executive producer.

Ferrell’s guest-starring turn on “The Office” will have him reuniting with Carell, who co-starred with him in perhaps the greatest comedy movie about television that has ever been produced: “Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy.” All we can say is: “Stay classy, Scranton!”