‘Wild Wild West’ Gets Reboot From ‘Battlestar’ And ‘CSI’ Vets

by | November 11, 2010 at 2:08 PM | Reboots & Redos, TV News

'The Wild Wild West'

'The Wild Wild West'

What do you get when you bring together executive producers of ‘CSI’ and ‘Battlestar Galactica’? CBS is hoping the result will be another successful “reboot” of one of its old, revered series – in this case, ‘The Wild Wild West.’

Naren Shankar of ‘CSI’ and Ron Moore of ‘Battlestar’ are teaming up to write and produce the fresh take, which aims to follows in the footsteps of CBS’ new ‘Hawaii Five-O’, Deadline.com reports.

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On the creative end, the combination of a police-show vet with a producer steeped in sci-fi would seem to be the right way to go for a series as fanciful as ‘The Wild Wild West,’ which ran for five seasons staring in 1965. Having previously been reimagined in 1999 as a movie  starring Will Smith and Kevin Kline, ‘Wild Wild West’ was once described by its original creator as “James Bond on horseback.”

Set in the post-Civil War western U.S., the series starred handsome TV tough guy Robert Conrad as Secret Service agent James West and Ross Martin as his partner, Artemus Gordon, a master of disguises and gadgets. West and Gordon clashed with a succession of 19th-century supervillains, most famously the dwarf Dr. Loveless (played by distinguished actor Michael Dunn).

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Though Shankar is best known for his work on ‘CSI,’ he does have some sci-fi on his resume – he was once an EP of ‘Farscape.’ By contrast, Moore’s background is comprised almost entirely sci-fi, including two ‘Star Treks’ – ‘The Next Generation’ and ‘Deep Space Nine’‘Roswell,’ ‘BSG’ and ‘Caprica.’

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As anyone who monitors this news column knows, remakes – er, sorry, “reboots” – are all the rage these days on TV. Among the many now in the works: ‘Charlie’s Angels,’ ‘The Rockford Files,’ ‘Dallas,’ ‘CHiPs’ and ‘Wonder Woman.’

What do you think of the trend? Is it a good thing, or simply a sign the networks are running out of new ideas?