Jon Stewart Responds to Shots from Olbermann, Maddow & Maher

by | November 9, 2010 at 5:32 AM | Late Night, The Daily Show, TV News

Last week, the Rally to Restore Sanity held by Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert seemed like a success, having drawn 250,000 people to the National Mall in Washington D.C. in an effort to tone down the political vitriol in America in an effort to get people with differing political views to stop calling each other Hitler. Over the last few days, though, it’s been attacked by MSNBC personalities like Keith Oblermann and Rachel Maddow for creating a “false equivalency” between them and Fox News, and ‘Real Time’ host Bill Maher went so far as to say the rally had no point at all. So on last night’s ‘Daily Show,’ Stewart defended the Rally against the naysayers that he usually agrees with.

“Clearly, the Rally was a massive failure,” Stewart said, sarcastically, “since my intention was not, as Bill described, to make no moral judgment between competing arguments and say ‘let’s all just get along.’ It was to suggest that we perhaps be more judicious with our blanket slandering. So unfortunately, I’m left with no choice. I have an announcement to make. This Saturday, November 13th, join me on the National Mall for The Rally to Determine Precisely The Percentage of Blame to Be Doled Out To The Left and The Right for Our Problems Because We All Know The Only Thing That Matters Is That The Other Guys Are Worse Than We Are And/Or Fear!”

More seriously, he added “Contrary to what people may believe, I do think the rally was about something, just not necessarily what they wanted it to be about or what they think it was about. If we were inartful in that message, we were inartful. I disagree with their classification of it, but I’m sure we’ll all have a chance to clarify it on each other’s programs for the next ten years.”

Since he was talking about Olbermann, he also took the time to address last weekend’s short-lived suspension of MSNBC’s top personality, simply saying “MSNBC has a hard and fast rule that political donations represent bias in journalism… unless you ask first. It’s a stupid rule, but at least it was enforced poorly.”