‘Heroes’ Creator Teases a ‘Strange Alliance’ and More

by | January 4, 2010 at 1:12 PM | Heroes, Matt's TV News

(NBC)

(NBC)

NBC’s ‘Heroes’ resumes its fourth season with a two-hour installment airing tonight at a special time, 8/7c. Series creator Tim Kring shared with Fancast a look at these next six episodes, the “strange alliance” that must be formed to (again) save the world, a romantic reunion, and what he finds silly about ‘X-Men’-style showdowns.

Most simply said, what do viewers have to look forward to during these next six episodes?
Our big bad this year is this carnival and what it represents – the whole idea of “Can you live in the real world out in the open?” Samuel’s plan to expose the entire world to these people starts to really crank up and build to a crescendo.

Samuel said that Claire is not the one he’s truly after. How soon does it become evident who he is targeting?
He’s had a complicated relationship with Claire’s father, Noah, and there are things he wants because of that. I think that becomes apparent pretty quickly.

And we’ll also find out what specifically Samuel is looking to avenge?
It’s not so much about what he wants to avenge, but the underlying motive for his slow descent into megalomaniacal insanity is revealed in Episodes 15 and 16 (airing January 11 and 18).

I’ve loved Robert Knepper since ‘Prison Break,’ and he’s been doing a terrific job here.
He’s one of those actors that brings a lot with him. When we first started talking about the part, he tried on different costumes, different looks with makeup and hair, and then he worked on the accent… It was a long, thought-out process to become this character. He also has tremendous chemistry with everybody he is on screen with. It’s like how it was with Jack Coleman and Zach Quinto, where their parts started out not nearly as big as they became but grew because the actor brought so much to it.

What kind of transformation might Claire undergo now that she is embedded at the carnival?
Well, a certain reality is going to set in when she sees that something more nefarious is going on here than she thought. Like with any cult, you get pulled in, but then you hopefully see the reality under the surface. She’s been lured in, and the arc of it now is her figuring out what to do now that she’s there.

Will Peter, in the wake of finally losing Nathan (played by Adrian Pasdar), seek out Claire?
That’s a pretty good analysis, yes. They do share a connection to Nathan as quasi peers, so they’re able to sort of bond over the loss of their brother and father. When those stories start to collide, we have a couple of episodes with the two of them together.

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One theory out there is that Peter will round up the heroes for a big showdown against Samuel and the carny folk.
OK, but remember: Samuel has no power unless he is surrounded by other people. So in some ways it’s about getting people away from him as opposed to bringing people towards him.

What’s ahead for Hiro, Ando and Suresh?
Hiro is going to get sidelined by his medical issue, so we are finally going to deal with that in Episode16. His quest is also to find Charlie (played by Jayma Mays, ‘Glee’) – and unfortunately she’s on another show! [Laughs] But we will finally deal with that in the season finale (airing February 8), when Charlie and Hiro are reunited.

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Will Sylar serve a definitive purpose during the remainder of this volume?
He re-encounters the carnival, but he’s also on a bit of an existential quest to find out what his life is all about. He was told he would die alone, and that starts to play on him. There is some unexpected stuff between him and Peter in the last two episodes. A strange alliance has to be formed.

You have seemed reluctant since the Season 1 finale to have the heroes unite and act in concert, à la the X-Men. Why is that?
First of all, logistically it becomes very hard to get everybody into one place. It’s a nightmare for shooting, the jigsaw puzzle of it all. Most television tries to avoid more than two people in a scene, for just that reason. It takes a third longer to a shoot a scene with three people, so when you get eight people in a scene, you really start to stretch things. Also, one of the problems with serialized storytelling is that it’s like a giant snowball, and the season finales start to be a lot of “running around.” You try to give everybody a part of the story so you don’t have them all arriving in one place, saying, “OK, you do this, and I’ll do this…” It becomes a little silly when that happens.

Want scoop about ‘Heroes’ or any other TV show? Have a burning question you want answered? Email MattMtvguy@gmail.com and read The Big Tease every Tuesday at Fancast!