What’s In Store For New Season Of ’30 Rock?’

by | October 14, 2009 at 1:22 PM | 30 Rock, TV News

Jack McBrayer on 30 Rock (NBC)

Jack McBrayer on 30 Rock (NBC)

In the third episode, puppet master Jeff Dunham will guest star as the Girly Show writing staff tries to crash a gay Halloween party. There will also be a guest spots by Betty White, Will Arnett and Steve Buscemi. Meanwhile, Jenna (Jane Krakowksi) will be further working her Its a dealbreaker, ladies! thing to more fame and celebrity.

Those are some of the early-season highlights from NBCs ‘30 Rock,’ which will kick off its fourth campaign Thursday.

Catch up on full episodes of 30 Rock here

As for series creator and star Tina Fey and her romantically challenged Liz Lemon, “she’ll be continuing her elusive quest for happiness in general,” coyly quipped executive producer Robert Carlock, hopping on the phone with reporters alongside Americas favorite NBC page, Kenneth (actor Jack McBrayer) to discuss the upcoming season.

Coming off a third consecutive Emmy award campaign in which ’30 Rock,’ despite only decent ratings, cleaned up on the comedy series trophies, Carlock said his writers had no plans to skew the show for broader appeal.

Watch a sneak peek of the season premiere below:

“We want to please as many people as we can, but we also want to please ourselves,” he said. “We wish we were the No. 1 show in America. Maybe well get there this year.”

Touching on a range of topics, Carlock was also asked about the culture of the ’30 Rock’ writers room; is it anything like that of the series show within a show? “We try to exercise a little more than they do,” he said. “Its best for us, in reality, to stay away from that version as best we can.”

However, he conceded that, “Occasionally, we do devolve,” citing a recent improvised game involving paddles and marbles. “We try to keep the writers room bare because people are easily distracted.”

Carlock also addressed the series much discussed dalliances with product integration. Once again, he denied claims that an arc last season featuring Alec Baldwin and Salma Hayek getting closer together via a popular McDonalds ice-cream confection had anything to do with getting paid.

“A lot of our jokes are about products because our characters tend to live in pop culture,” he said. “The McDondalds thing was actually just a creative choice about two characters finding common ground McFlurry, bringing together Hispanic women and Republican men since forever.”

For his part, McBrayer said it is difficult for him not to be typecast as Kenneth the Page that’s kind of who he is.

“I can lose the navy blazer, but thats about it,” he said. “But its fine. When people are tired of seeing that, I might flex some other muscles. But for now, I’m happy where I’m at.”

And it’s not a bad life. In fact, there are places in New York where McBrayer is a real hero.

“I get special attention from the pages every time I’m in the real Rockefeller Center,” he noted.