What’s Hot (And Free) This Weekend On Fancast? “Burn Notice,” “Friends” And “Less Than Zero”

by | January 24, 2009 at 11:16 AM | What We're Watching

What’s hot (and free) this weekend on Fancast?

For a sharp hour of drama, try ‘Burn Notice‘ . The return of the USA drama after a five-month break was the most watched show on cable last Thursday, drawing 5.1 million viewers. Stars Jeffrey Donovan and Gabrielle Anwar are snack food for the eyes. In case you need more than our endorsement, Dallas Morning News critic Tom Maustad noted the show “keeps things basic, but riveting,” the Chicago Tribune’s Maureen Ryan called the action of this show downright “enjoyable,” and USA Today gave it three and a half stars.

If you feel more like a comedy or a feature movie, you’re in luck.

Watch Burn Notice here

Here’s a surprising recommendation: Jennifer Aniston. She has arrived at the awkward corner between cute and 40+. Her freshest and most fun days are in the past; now she’s just another working actress, albeit a very wealthy one, trying to convince movie-makers and movie-goers that she’s as interesting on the screen as she appears to be off it. (Think Meg Ryan before her.) Tip to Jen: quit whining and grimacing so much.

Her best and most endearing role will always be Rachel on Friends, and so on this rainy day in Southern California and chilly Saturday across the rest of the country, we suggest taking 22 minutes to rediscover and appreciate Jen at her best and most endearing – that first season of Friends when she was new, sexy, still relatively unknown, and still the girl other girls wanted to be and guys wanted to date.

Finally, if you’re in the mood for a film, sit back and watch ‘Less Than Zero,” the movie version of Brett Easton Ellis’ celebrated novel about rich Beverly Hills high schoolers, drugs and sex. It features an excellent performance from Robert Downey Jr., who still had a mountain of drug abuse and rehab ahead of him. For that reason alone, it’s interesting to watch. But it’s even more fascinating as a time capsule, for here the roots of excess are captured in the generation that would fuel the bubble of greed the country suffers from today. Hey, self-destruction has never been this enjoyable.