Ticket or Click It: The ’80s Strike Back

by | March 16, 2012 at 11:31 AM | Movies, Ticket or Click It

Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill in '21 Jump Street' (Photo: Columbia)

By Rebecca Kelley

With non-existent winter now banished, how should you celebrate the advent of a spring that feels like summer? (Sprummer?) With a movie, of course! “Ticket or Click It” is here to break down your cinematic options, should you feel like snuggling down at home with On Demand or get the hankering to head to the theater. Click on the movie titles for more information about ordering On Demand or buying tickets through Fandango. And enjoy the sunshine.

 

What’s On Demand?

The Descendants

Matt King (George Clooney) has problems. In the midst of a big business land deal decision, his wife ends up in a coma. As he grapples with the increasingly bad news of his wife’s condition, he must gather his daughters together and guide them through grief. All that would be enough, but he learns things about her he probably would rather not know.

Our take: This family drama is well acted and incredibly honest, but very sad. It doesn’t pull at your heartstrings the way some more emotive movies do, but it does show a man trying very hard to be good, strong and honest in the worst of circumstances. Understandably, it earned several Oscar nominations, including Best Actor for George Clooney.

Happy Feet 2

Mumble the penguin is now grown up (sort of) and has a little hatchling of his own with his love Gloria. Like his father, little Eric has trouble finding his voice. When shifting ice traps all the penguins in a chasm, it’s up to Eric and Mumble, with a few friends, to save the day.

Our take: If you ignore the story and just enjoy the amazing music and beautiful animation, it’s an enjoyable movie. The story serves little purpose, except to fill time between songs. The movie will keep your own hatchlings quiet for a bit, but it won’t be one they’ll want to watch again and again.

The Three Musketeers

Against a backdrop of intrigue in the French court, the three Musketeers – plus young D’Artagnan – fight the dastardly Richlieu, who has his own henchmen and woman (Milady, played by Milla Jovovich).

Our take: Overblown and over-modernized, this movie saps all the charm out of the original story. Too much silliness, too much pomp and too much unbelievable antics. Too much toomuchness.

 

What’s In Theaters?

Jeff, Who Lives at Home

Jeff, a young adult slacker who, indeed, still lives at home, sets out to buy wood glue for his mother. Along the way, he looks for signs but finds relatives. Sometimes, in compromising situations.

Our take: Occasionally funny and definitely quirky, this movie will be an acquired taste. Susan Sarandon is great as Jeff’s mother, Ed Helms not so much as his father. How much you like it depends on your tolerance for coincidence and whimsy.

21 Jump Street

A pair of incompetent police officers get demoted to a bottom-tier job: Busting a drug ring at their old high school by going undercover as students. And things have changed in the seven years since they graduated. The cool kids are sensitive and globally conscious and the jocks have all but disappeared. But one thing hasn’t changed – these cops are just as juvenile as the teens they’re investigating.

Our take: The unlikely pairing of Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill works very well. Surprisingly well. Tatum is actually funny and the film makes us believe that they are oddly mismatched friends. The movie pokes fun at everything from Hollywood remakes to racial stereotypes, all to good effect. Even the requisite car chases are done with tongue in cheek. Plus, there are a few surprising moments that make you roar. It’s a very funny, fresh movie in much the same way that “Bridesmaids” was fresh and funny. And like “Bridesmaids,” it keeps the profanity going from the first moment and contains enough sexual references and crude humor to make a high school teacher blush.

 

Ticket or Click It?

Ticket! Go see the franchise that made Johnny Depp famous, “21 Jump Street.”

 

The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Comcast.